People

Christian Agatemor

Christian Agatemor, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
I seek to understand how ionic liquids function in oral drug delivery and engineer them to effectively deliver anti-diabetic and anti-cancer drugs across the complex barriers in the gastrointestinal tract. I am also exploring ionic liquids as platforms for oral vaccination.
Northwest Building, B160
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Tyler Brown

Tyler Brown

Graduate Student
Delivering chemotherapeutics, neuroprotective agents, and other drugs to the brain has proven to be a challenging feat, primarily due to the physical yet dynamic blood brain barrier (BBB). My work focuses on developing a human brain-on-a-chip to better assess and help improve upon promising drug delivery technologies for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other brain-related diseases.
Wyss Institute
3 Blackfan Circle, 2nd Floor
Room 206-7A, Center for Life Science
Boston, MA
Anshuman Dasgupta

Anshuman Dasgupta

Fellow
I am a master's student from Prof. Twan Lammers lab and have come here as an exchange student to pursue my master thesis. I will be working on nanocarrier based systems and RBC hitchhiking for gene delivery to and into lung and desmoplastic tumors. As a side project, I will also be synthesizing microbubbles of different shapes for ultrasound imaging and drug delivery applications.
Northwest Building, B164
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Kelly Ibsen

Kelly Ibsen

Fellow
My research is focused on the use of ionic liquids in medical applications. For transdermal drug delivery, ILs can enhance penetration of macromolecules like insulin through the skin, alleviating the need for painful injections. ILs also exhibit antimicrobial activity, and are particularly good at disrupting biofilms created by some bacterial species.
Northwest Building, B164
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
VK

Vinu Krishnan, MSE, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
At Harvard, I specialize in developing safe and effective nanomedicine for adult and childhood cancers. I am working towards the clinical translation of multi drug-loaded polymeric systems for treating skin cancers, leukemia and T-cell lymphomas with increased efficacy and reduced toxicity. At extremely low doses of drugs, these formulations could save lives and ensure an improved quality of life for every child or adult treated for cancer.
Northwest Building, B165
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Prof. Samir Mitragotri

Professor Samir Mitragotri

Principal Investigator
Hiller Professor of Bioengineering and Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering
Core Faculty Member, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
Prof. Mitragotri has made groundbreaking contributions to the field of biological barriers and drug delivery. His research has advanced fundamental understanding of biological barriers and has led to the development of new materials as well as technologies for diagnosis and treatment of various ailments including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, skin conditions and infections, among others. Many of his technologies have advanced to human clinical studies and products. At the same time, fundamental understanding developed through his research has advanced the understanding of the biology of barriers in the human body.
211 Pierce Hall
Kevin Peng

Kevin Peng

Graduate Student
Oral delivery of insulin for the treatment of diabetes has remained a highly desirable yet challenging goal for several decades due to poor absorption of proteins through the intestine. My research focuses on developing novel multifunctional nanoparticles encased in mucoadhesive patches for enhanced mucus penetration and intestinal absorption of biopharmaceuticals.
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Anusha Pusuluri

Anusha Pusuluri

Fellow
My graduate work focuses on engineering clever cancer-selective drug delivery platforms by combining our lab's unique understanding of drug combination fundamentals together with cutting edge bio-recognition agents. Our innovative strategy employs a carefully controlled drug combination, that is inherently cancer specific, for superior dose reduction and enhanced tumor recognition thereby enabling exceptional therapeutic effects.
Northwest Building, B158
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Apoorva Sarode

Apoorva Sarode

Graduate Student
Cardiovascular diseases and trauma are the leading causes of death in the world. My research work is focused on developing bioinspired polymeric platforms which can integrate the physical and biological parameters of natural platelets for targeted action. These platforms can be used to halt internal bleeding as well as for the detection and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases.
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Wyatt

C. Wyatt Shields IV, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
A major challenge in cell-based immunotherapies is controlling cell function once injected into the body. My research seeks to develop tools to manipulate the activation and suppression pathways of macrophages in vivo via field-responsive particle backpacks. 
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
David Smith

David Smith

Graduate Student (UCSB)
I work on fundamental theoretical and simulation-based platform for understanding the impact of nanoparticle design (size, surface chemistry, shape, softness, surface roughness and topology) on its interactions and transport processes with model cellular membranes for therapeutic and consumer product applications.
UCSB