People

Wyatt

C. Wyatt Shields IV, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
A major challenge in cell-based immunotherapies is controlling cell function once injected into the body. My research seeks to develop tools to manipulate the activation and suppression pathways of macrophages in vivo via field-responsive particle backpacks. 
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
David Smith

David Smith

Graduate Student (UCSB)
I work on fundamental theoretical and simulation-based platform for understanding the impact of nanoparticle design (size, surface chemistry, shape, softness, surface roughness and topology) on its interactions and transport processes with model cellular membranes for therapeutic and consumer product applications.
UCSB
Tao Sun

Tao Sun, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
My primary research goal is to develop translational focused ultrasound (FUS) technologies in advancement of drug delivery and immunomodulation for treating cancer and neurological diseases. To overcome biological barriers which challenge drug delivery applications significantly, ultrasound-activated oscillating microbubbles are used to create stresses locally on nearby vasculature/tissue or induce biomechanical effects that promote drug penetration into tissue. The mechanical perturbations would further facilitate enhanced immune responses and neuronal activity interference. In Mitragotri Lab, I am mainly working on investigating (A) drug delivery via bio-synthetic systems and bio-inspired nanoparticles after FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption; (B) theranostic feasibility via particle hitch-hacking during FUS immunotherapy for brain cancer. I am co-advised by Prof. Nathan McDannold at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
Longwood – 221 Longwood Ave, EBRC 521, Boston, MA 02115
Cambridge – Northwest Building B160, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Isabella

Isabella Suzuki

I am a PhD student in Prof. Bentley's lab  at the University of São Paulo – Brazil. My research focuses on the treatment of psoriasis by silencing the TNF-alpha inflammation protein using siRNA-TNF-alpha bound to solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In Prof. Mitragotri´s lab, my research focuses treating psoriasis using siRNA-TNF-alpha bound to an ionic liquid, CAGE, and validating the system in mice models of psoriasis (Imiquimod method).

Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Eden Tanner

Eden Tanner, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents could be the key to unlocking selective, effective biomedicine - but understanding the fundamental microscopic interactions within the ionic solvents is essential. My research focuses on elucidating what is happening at a molecular level, working towards the development of smart solvents that are tailored for purpose.
Northwest Building, B160
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Anvay Ukidve

Anvay Ukidve

Graduate Student
Allergies are leading cause of discomfort throughout the world. Small otherwise harmless molecules like pollen enter the body and induce our immune system to react in a deleterious manner. My project employs red blood cell (RBC) hitchhiking to engineer the responses of our immune system to allergens and develop tolerance against them.
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Jamie

Jeymesson Vieira, PhD

Wound healing after skin damage is a complex process and although tissue repair is an evolution of the body itself to solve the wound, some of them need special care for proper healing. I am a professor of histology and embryology in Federal University of Pernambuco UFPE/Brazil and as a visitor professor at Mitragotri’s lab I have studied technologies to increase skin permeability in drug transport bringing transcutaneous skin therapy beyond the state-of-art.
Northwest Building, B164
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Debra Wu

Debra Wu

Graduate Student
Liposomes for synergistic combination chemotherapy delivery
Northwest Building, B165
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Zongmin Zhao

Zongmin Zhao, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
Immunomodulation represents a promising approach for treating many diseases and disorders prophylactically or therapeutically. My research focuses on using red blood cell hitchhiking, transdermal vaccination, and oral vaccination to modulate the immune responses. I am also interested in using synthetic platelet and platelet hitchhiking for metastatic cancer treatment.
Northwest Building, B164
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138