People

Prof. Samir Mitragotri

Professor Samir Mitragotri

Hiller Professor of Bioengineering and Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering
Core Faculty Member, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
Prof. Mitragotri has made groundbreaking contributions to the field of biological barriers and drug delivery. His research has advanced fundamental understanding of biological barriers and has led to the development of new materials as well as technologies for diagnosis and treatment of various ailments including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, skin conditions and infections, among others. Many of his technologies have advanced to human clinical studies and products. At the same time, fundamental understanding developed through his research has advanced the understanding of the biology of barriers in the human body.
211 Pierce Hall
Mayuka Nakajima

Mayuka Nakajima, DDS, PhD

My research focuses on application of ionic liquids (ILs) to periodontal treatment. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by bacteria, which results in destruction of the connective tissues and bone around the teeth. Owing to antimicrobial activity and high mucosal permeability of ILs, they are anticipated to provide preventive and/or therapeutic benefits in periodontitis.

Wyss Institute
3 Blackfan Circle, 2nd Floor
Room 206-8B, Center for Life Science
Boston, MA
Nao Nakajima

Nao Nakajima, M.D., PhD

Tissue adhesive biomaterials exhibit sustained release of therapeutic agents and have the potential to treat intractable digestive diseases. My work focuses on developing biomaterials for the treatment of esophageal stricture after endoscopic therapy, inflammatory bowel diseases and advanced cancer. I hope to improvise my experiences as a gastroenterologist to improve drug delivery.

Wyss Institute
3 Blackfan Circle, 2nd Floor
Room 206-8A, Center for Life Science
Boston, MA
Nabi

Md "Nabi" Nurunnabi, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow

Delivering therapeutics to the right cells of interest at the right time is not only necessary for higher therapeutic efficacy but also for limiting their off-target mediated toxicity. My interest lies on developing bioengineered advanced delivery approach for cell specific drug delivery for treatment of chronic diseases. My research within Mitragotri Lab is focused on oral delivery of large molecules and understanding their biological fate and therapeutic mechanism in cellular level.

Northwest Building, B158
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Kevin Peng

Kevin Peng

Graduate Student
Oral delivery of insulin for the treatment of diabetes has remained a highly desirable yet challenging goal for several decades due to poor absorption of proteins through the intestine. My research focuses on developing novel multifunctional nanoparticles encased in mucoadhesive patches for enhanced mucus penetration and intestinal absorption of biopharmaceuticals.
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Maggie

Qin Qi (Maggie), PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
I am interested in studying drug delivery as a transport phenomenon. A fundamental understanding of transport processes in drug delivery will help us to design better drug carriers for a variety of applications. The unique densely-packed structure of the skin poses a formidable biological barrier for transdermal drug delivery. I am performing a mechanistic study of how macromolecules permeate through the skin with the aid of ionic liquids, which potentially changes the skin structure. My second research project is to systematically investigate how nanoparticle-hitchhiked red blood cells interact with the flow environment in microcirculation and explore the critical conditions for nanoparticles to detach and release drugs.
Northwest Building, B160
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Marwa A. Sallam

Marwa Ahmed Sallam, PhD

Fulbright Scholar
Skin disorders as acne, psoriasis and more aggressive ones as skin cancer cause serious complications in patients ranging from loss of self-confidence and extending more to pain and discomfort and can be fatal as in more serious cases of melanoma. Skin cancer is the most common class of malignancy in humans with increasing incidence worldwide. My research focuses on the development of rationally designed multifunctional polymer conjugates for targeted treatment of skin cancer. The most important criteria in the designated polymer conjugates will be its ability to deliver the therapeutic moiety to the targeted skin layers providing a controlled sustained release of the drug while minimizing the dosing frequency. This hopefully can results in improved patient compliance and better therapeutic outcomes.
Northwest building- B153
52 Oxford street,
Cambridge, MA 02138
Apoorva Sarode

Apoorva Sarode

Graduate Student
Cardiovascular diseases and trauma are the leading causes of death in the world. My research work is focused on developing bioinspired polymeric platforms which can integrate the physical and biological parameters of natural platelets for targeted action. These platforms can be used to halt internal bleeding as well as for the detection and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases.
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
YS

Yujie Shi, PhD

Oral drug delivery is the most preferred and convenient route of drug administration. My research focuses on constructing novel oral drug delivery system with ionic liquids and micro patches to improve the efficacy of existing small molecule drugs.
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Wyatt

C. Wyatt Shields IV, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
A major challenge in cell-based immunotherapies is controlling cell function once injected into the body. My research seeks to develop tools to manipulate the activation and suppression pathways of macrophages in vivo via field-responsive particle backpacks. 
Northwest Building, B153
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
Tao Sun

Tao Sun, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
My primary research goal is to develop translational focused ultrasound (FUS) technologies in advancement of drug delivery and immunomodulation for treating cancer and neurological diseases. To overcome biological barriers which challenge drug delivery applications significantly, ultrasound-activated oscillating microbubbles are used to create stresses locally on nearby vasculature/tissue or induce biomechanical effects that promote drug penetration into tissue. The mechanical perturbations would further facilitate enhanced immune responses and neuronal activity interference. In Mitragotri Lab, I am mainly working on investigating (A) drug delivery via bio-synthetic systems and bio-inspired nanoparticles after FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption; (B) theranostic feasibility via particle hitch-hacking during FUS immunotherapy for brain cancer. I am co-advised by Prof. Nathan McDannold at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
Longwood – 221 Longwood Ave, EBRC 521, Boston, MA 02115
Cambridge – Northwest Building B160, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Eden Tanner

Eden Tanner, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow
Ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents could be the key to unlocking selective, effective biomedicine - but understanding the fundamental microscopic interactions within the ionic solvents is essential. My research focuses on elucidating what is happening at a molecular level, working towards the development of smart solvents that are tailored for purpose.
Northwest Building, B160
52 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138